Metro

Majority of NYC parents ready to vax their 5- to 11-year-olds: poll

A majority of New York City metro-area parents are ready to have their young kids vaccinated for the coronavirus, a new survey reveals.

Fifty-six percent of parents with children under the age of 12 in the city and the surrounding suburbs said they were very or somewhat likely to have them jabbed for COVID-19, according to the poll conducted by the CUNY School of Public Health/NY Vaccine Literacy Campaign.

Another 35 percent of parents said they were unlikely to have them vaccinated with the rest unsure.

The survey was conducted between Aug. 30 and Sept. 1, well before the Centers for Disease Control on Nov. 2 approved the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for young kids between the ages of 5 and 11.

That could means more parents will be inclined to have their kids vaccinated since the poll was conducted, public health experts say.

Parents represented about 40 percent of the 1,000 respondents in New York City, Long Island and Westchester and Suffolk counties queried. About 27 percent of the respondents have young children under the age of 12.

“Parental support of the vaccine for children will prove to be a giant leap forward in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic,” says Dr. Ayman El-Mohandes, CUNY School of Public Health Dean and a lead author of the survey.

A survey found a majority of parents in New York City want to have their eligible children vaccinated for COVID-19.
A survey found a majority of parents in the New York City area want to have their eligible children vaccinated for COVID-19.
Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

“We must protect every precious child. With every family member immunized there is a significantly lowered risk of exposure to the virus and its variants, which is especially heartening as we look forward to family gatherings around the upcoming holidays.”

El-Mohandes said he expects the percentage of parents willing to get their young children vaccinated for COVID-19 will surge now that public health officials have given the green light to do so.

“The numbers will go up. People have a wait and see attitude when something is hypothetical. When something becomes a practical reality the numbers rise,” El-Mohandes told The Post.

He also said there will be some “peer pressure” for parents to follow the lead of other parents to have their kids vaccinated in order to make the school environment “less restrictive.”

Only 35 percent of the parents surveyed said that they were unlikely to vaccinate their children.
Only 35 percent of the parents surveyed said that they were unlikely to vaccinate their children.
Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Teachers and students want to see the day when they no longer have to wear masks and high vaccination rates is the pathway for that to happen, the CUNY dean said.

“Let’s keep our finger crossed,” said El-Mohandes.

Mayor Bill de Blasio recently made the coronavirus vaccine available at schools and Gov. Kathy Hochul has just opened up mass vaccination sites across the state for children ages 5 to 11, including at Aqueduct Racetrack and Medgar Evers College.

About one-third of the survey respondents also had a child between the ages of 12 to 18. They were previously approved for the COVID-19 vaccine.

Among them, 64 percent of parents had already gotten their child vaccinated with at least one dose at the time of the survey or had intended to do so.

Dr. Ayman El-Mohandes, CUNY School of Public Health Dean and a lead author of the survey, said he believes the number of willing parents will increase now that the vaccine has officially been approved for young children.
Dr. Ayman El-Mohandes, CUNY School of Public Health Dean and a lead author of the survey, said he believes the number of willing parents will increase now that the vaccine has officially been approved for young children.
Photo by ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

It’s also important for adults to get and stay vaccinated, the CUNY dean said.

De Blasio on Monday announced that city residents who received the COVID-19 vaccine more than six months ago are eligible for their booster shot.

“As long as the virus has the chance to live, it can generate variants that can be nefarious or even more fatal than we have seen before,” El-Mohandes said.

The survey also noted differences in vaccination rates among insured and uninsured respondents. A higher number of uninsured residents had not been vaccinated.

The survey of 1,000 respondents had a margin of error of plus or minus three percentage points.


Source link